Monthly Archives: November 2012

Using LinkedIn to Search for Talent

Using LinkedIn to Search for Talent

In our previous post, Finding Partners on LinkedIn, we continued our series with a discussion on how to find partners for your business on LinkedIn.  In this post, we continue with a look at how to find and recruit talent on LinkedIn.


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Using LinkedIn to Search for Talent

If you’re recruiting in the current economic downturn, you’re well aware of the perils of posting a job requisition on even a single online job board. The result is likely to be dozens or hundreds of resumes, many of which are not only not in the ballpark, but not even the same solar system as your requirements.

This growing deluge of eager jobseekers has accelerated an already growing trend in talent acquisition (AKA finding people to hire). More and more enterprises are de-emphasizing offline and online job posting and turning to social media sourcing, using social media sites such as LinkedIn to locate top candidates and invite them to apply, for free.

This new emphasis is akin to a fisherman changing from casting a wide net in hopes of catching a single prize fish to using sophisticated mapping and sonar to fish where the fish are.

LinkedIn is an ideal environment for finding those trophy fish.

If you’re an enterprise of some size and you’re serious about recruiting on LinkedIn, you can sign up for a LinkedIn Recruiter[1] account. This type of account drastically improves your ability to search on LinkedIn, adds the ability to create alerts, gives you 50 InMails (ability to email anyone on LinkedIn) per month, and allows you to check references instantly. As part of their Talent Advantage program, LinkedIn also offers features such as employment ads, annual subscriptions for job listings, and customizable company profiles you can use to display different job information to LinkedIn members based on their profiles.

Be prepared to shell out some money for these features, however. Although details on cost are sketchy, it’s been reported that $29,800 is the minimum investment for the LinkedIn Talent Advantage Starter Package. You can go a bit cheaper by upgrading to one of LinkedIn’s regular paid accounts, which range from $24.95/month to $499.95/month, with discounts for buying a full year.

If you’d rather not commit that much money before getting results, here are some less-expensive ideas for finding that perfect hire:

  • Advertise in Your Profile
    If you’re looking for talent, say so in your LinkedIn profile. Adding a simple line such as, “Looking for an outreach manager” or “Need a policy researcher,” or even adding, “hiring” to your professional headline can attract interest. Of course, we assume you’ve already described your business in other sections of your profile, so prospective applicants can learn more. This is often more effective than blind job postings, and is more likely to attract passive candidates — those who are not actively looking for a job.
  • Ask Your Network for Help
    If you’re trying to fill a position, let your connections know. One good way is to change your LinkedIn status, indicating what kind of candidate you’re looking for. Another good technique is to contact your connections, either through LinkedIn or via email, let them know about your talent search, and ask them to recommend people in their networks.
  • List Your Job in a LinkedIn Group
    Most groups have an active Jobs section, where members post jobs and find jobs. It’s free for group members to list a job in these sections.
  • Post Your Job on LinkedIn
    You may have noticed there’s a Jobs link on the LinkedIn toolbar. You can post jobs on LinkedIn, but it will cost you $195 for a 30-day posting, or you can save up to 40 percent with a multi-job pack.
  • Use LinkedIn Answers
    The LinkedIn Answers feature lets you ask a public question. Any LinkedIn member can answer the question, plus, you can directly message those who answer. So your question could be, “Who’d like to be my next Project Manager?”
  • Use LinkedIn’s Email Signature Tool
    LinkedIn has a free tool that helps you create an email signature — that bit of contact information you see at the bottom of people’s emails. One useful function is the ability to include a “We’re hiring” link. When an email recipient clicks on the link, it opens and searches LinkedIn Jobs for open positions at your company. Two other interesting links you can add are:

    • “Professional Profile” link which displays your profile
    • “See who we know in common” link which displays your profile, and focuses on common connections

All of these ideas, however, share one thing in common: They’re very similar to the post-your-job-and-hope model of talent acquisition by casting a wide net.

One of the advantages of LinkedIn is that you can find out lots about other members from their public profiles. So to find those passive candidates, or to avoid getting inundated with resumes due to public job posts, use the techniques discussed in the previous section to find candidates to invite to apply for your openings.

In fact, you may find a passive candidate may be a better choice than one who is actively looking. A LinkedIn poll found that 60 percent of employers said that passive candidates made better employees. If you believe, as unfortunately many do, that the best talent is always employed, then you can understand these poll results.

One final tip: use Google to search for people with a particular number of LinkedIn recommendations. The following search produces a list of 24 highly-recommended candidates:

site:linkedin.com +”7 Recommendations ” +”project manager” +minnesota

These 24 folks are likely to be not only highly experienced but, ahem, come highly recommended.

Power Tool: Mozenda

One technique you might use with LinkedIn involves scraping the results of searches right into Microsoft Excel. Using Mozenda,[2] a versatile screen scraper that starts at $99/month, you can run the LinkedIn people search and have results exported as a CSV or Excel file. Of course, since free LinkedIn accounts only return 100 name results per search, this is another incentive to upgrade to one of the premium accounts and get 300, 500, or 700 results per search.


Using LinkedIn to Search for Talent is the 85th in a series of excerpts from our book, Be a Person: the Social Operating Manual for Enterprises (itself part of a series for different audiences). We’re just past page 251. At this rate it’ll be a long time before we get through all 430 pages, but luckily, if you’re impatient, the book is available in paper form at bit.ly/OrderBeAPerson and you can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

Infinite Pipeline book cover

Get our new book, The Infinite Pipeline: How to Master Social Media for Business-to-Business Sales Success online here. You can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

What Others Are Saying

Infinite Pipeline offers practical advice for using social media to extend relationship selling online. It’s a great way to get crazy-busy prospects to pay attention.”
—Jill Konrath, author of SNAP Selling and Selling to Big Companies

“Sales is all about relationships and trust. Infinite Pipeline is the ‘how to’ guide for maximizing social networks to find and build relationships, and generate trust in our digital age.”
—Sam Richter, best-selling author, Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling (2012 Sales book of the year)

Infinite Pipeline will be the authority on building lasting relationships through online social that result in bottom line business.”
—Lori Ruff, The LinkedIn Diva, Speaker/Author and CEO of Integrated Alliances

Next up: Who is on LinkedIn?


[1] LinkedIn Recruiter page: bit.ly/cjZwqU

[2] Mozenda: bit.ly/nUCISj

5 Things Auto Brands Can Teach You About Online Marketing

See on Scoop.itSocial Selling for Lawyers

“If you’re looking to gauge brands’ engagement with digital media, look no further than the automotive industry. Here’s why.

 

According to research from Martini Media, 62% of auto companies plan to shift TV dollars to online media. Furthermore, 95% believe that rich media is “as effective as TV advertising.” Companies with strong roots in offline should find the shift to online video easy, as long as they remember to keep online videos short and put them where they’re likely to be shared: on YouTube, Facebook or the brand site.”

See on mashable.com

All Together Now: Let’s Kill Marketing! (Your Company is Depending on You) – Ciceron

See on Scoop.itSocial Selling for Lawyers

This is a tremendous blog post by a friend:

 

“Culture is changing. These media companies don’t overlay across actual consumer behaviors. And executives fall for the curse. Over and over, I hear these self-delusional myths:

 

“You can’t measure digital.”
“You can’t measure social media.”
“Our customers don’t use smart phones.”
“No one buys anything on social networks.”
“What if people say the wrong things about us?”
“What if our competitors are listening in?”
“But what about our distribution channel? Won’t they get upset if we start to engage our customers directly, even if those customers want to?”

 

What if times have changed? You can’t unwind digital just as you can’t unwind the fact that America is increasingly diverse. There’s a decision deficit that’s driving good people out of corporate America while denial-based leaders continue on. We saw how that mentality played out last Tuesday, and we’ll see it across boardrooms as well. We’re talking capitalism now, not government.”

See on www.ciceron.com

The End of the Expert: Why No One in Marketing Knows What They’re Doing – Forbes

See on Scoop.itSocial Selling for Lawyers

“Richard Branson’s Virgin is one company that’s succeeding in the new era of marketing. It’s a stark verdict from a prominent source,  Clark Kokich, chairman of digital agency Razorfish.”

 

“It’s less about advertising and more about creating an experience that transforms what it means to be a customer of a brand. And that change has really caused a lot of consternation in marketing because none of us were trained to do that.”

See on www.forbes.com

Finding Partners on LinkedIn

In our previous post, Building Relationships on LinkedIn, we continued our series with a discussion on how to build better relationships and connect with those in your space.  In this post, we continue with a look at how to find partners for your business on LinkedIn.


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Finding Partners

If you’re ready to find a partner — for a joint venture, for creating an event, or to form a new venture — you may find the experience is a lot like dating: Kiss a lot of frogs, and hope to get lucky. That’s partly because meeting with a new potential partner is like a blind date. You know a little about each other, and may have some friends in common, but you don’t have a relationship yet.

Well, there are more than more than 100 million frogs to kiss on LinkedIn, but one advantage of using the site is that you can get to know a lot more about your blind date before committing to dance with them.

You can start your search for a partner by using LinkedIn’s advanced search feature. Along with normal things like location and company, you can search by all kinds of other relevant attributes such as:

  • Function
  • Seniority Level
  • Company Size
  • Interested In

This last attribute is very useful in finding members who are interested in making deals, and the seniority level attribute lets you search for decision makers.

Unfortunately, to use this and the other search attributes in the above list, you must upgrade from the free membership to at least the $24.95 a month Business level. But if you’re serious about making a deal with a partner, it’s not much money, and you can cancel at any time. Plus you get more InMails (ability to message random people to whom you are not connected) and search results limited to 300 instead of 100 items.

Even if you don’t upgrade, you can use the advanced search to zero in on potential partners, or better still, use Google to search LinkedIn.

Power Tool: Google

An alternative to paying for better LinkedIn search is to use Google, which places no limits on the number of search results. Simply format your Google query like either of the following:

site:linkedin.com +<name of your industry> +CEO +<your location>

site:linkedin.com +<name of your industry > +“business deals” +<your location>

For example, the following query recently turned up 23,700 results — 23X the number you could get with the free LinkedIn account:

site:linkedin.com +CEO +”medical device” +Minneapolis

The “site:” modifier restricts the Google search to pages on the target site, in this case, LinkedIn. The plus sign means the keyword is required. In this case, both “CEO” and the phrase “medical device” are required. There are lots of other modifiers you can use with advanced Google searching as well. Remember, however, Google search is limited to LinkedIn members’ public profiles, while the internal search looks at all member information.

Researching Potential Partners

Now that you have your candidate list, prioritize it based on the Google results and start visiting their profiles. Be sure to note the LinkedIn Groups the candidates belong to; you may want to join those groups so you can contact them. Also note whether you have second- or third-level connections who may be able to introduce you.

Once you’ve got a short list, be sure to Google each candidate and visit any relevant Websites you discover.

Making the Connection

There are many advantages to joining LinkedIn Groups. The most relevant one here is that you can privately or publicly message other group members. You can also use your group membership as a reason to send a connection request. So join the groups your short-listed candidates belong to, and start forging a relationship with them.

You also may want your current connections to connect you. We talk more about this manner of getting connected in the upcoming post Three Degrees of LinkedIn.

We recommend only trying to connect to second level contacts this way (friends of your friends). The positive effect of an introduction can be lessened with third level contacts (friends of your friends’ friends).

Once you’re connected, let the relationship begin! Here’s hoping you get lucky!


Finding Partners on LinkedIn is the 84th in a series of excerpts from our book, Be a Person: the Social Operating Manual for Enterprises (itself part of a series for different audiences). We’re just past page 249 . At this rate it’ll be a long time before we get through all 430 pages, but luckily, if you’re impatient, the book is available in paper form at bit.ly/OrderBeAPerson and you can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

Infinite Pipeline book cover

Get our new book, The Infinite Pipeline: How to Master Social Media for Business-to-Business Sales Success online here. You can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

What Others Are Saying

Infinite Pipeline offers practical advice for using social media to extend relationship selling online. It’s a great way to get crazy-busy prospects to pay attention.”
—Jill Konrath, author of SNAP Selling and Selling to Big Companies

“Sales is all about relationships and trust. Infinite Pipeline is the ‘how to’ guide for maximizing social networks to find and build relationships, and generate trust in our digital age.”
—Sam Richter, best-selling author, Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling (2012 Sales book of the year)

Infinite Pipeline will be the authority on building lasting relationships through online social that result in bottom line business.”
—Lori Ruff, The LinkedIn Diva, Speaker/Author and CEO of Integrated Alliances

Next up: Using LinkedIn to Search for Talent

Building Relationships on LinkedIn

Building Relationships on LinkedIn

In our previous post, Prospecting for Customers on LinkedIn, we continued our series with a discussion on how to locate customers on LinkedIn.  In this post, we continue with a look at how to build better relationships and connect with those in your space.


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Building Relationships on LinkedIn

Here are some steps you can take to build a relationship with an individual or an organization via LinkedIn.

  • Find people in the organization— Obviously, your first step is to inspect the organization’s Website to find relevant people to try to contact on LinkedIn. If this doesn’t work, you can use Google to look for staff email addresses, and from that figure out people’s names.  Use a query of the following form: “*@nameoforg.org”. Substitute the domain name (the part after the www in the organization’s Website URL) for “nameoforg.org.” This query will find email addresses that have appeared on the organization’s Webpages or elsewhere on the Web, and from the email addresses, you can probably figure out their names. It’s good to have the person’s email address because one of the ways you can connect with people on LinkedIn is to use their email address.If you know the person’s name, but don’t have their email address, there are a variety of services, such as Email Dossier,[1]that let you input an email address and find if it is currently valid. The Google search previously mentioned should give you an idea of the format the organization uses for its email addresses, so even if the search doesn’t turn up the target person’s email address, you can guess at the format and use Email Dossier to see if it’s valid. If your search didn’t turn up the general format of the organization’s email addresses, try using the following formats in Email Dossier:
    • firstname.lastname@domainname
    • firstname_lastname@domainname
    • lastname@domainname
    • firstname plus last initial @domainname
    • first initial plus last name @domainname
    • last name plus first initial @domainname
    • Look them up on LinkedIn — Once you’ve identified the prospective contact, do a People Search on LinkedIn by simply typing their name in the search box at the top of any LinkedIn page. If you find them, go to their profile page. See what groups they belong to, or if anyone you know can introduce you. There’s more on getting introduced in the upcoming post Three Degrees of LinkedIn.
    • Join the groups they are in — LinkedIn Groups are a great way to get to know people. There are thousands of groups, and most are open for anyone to join. By joining a group you can find out more about your target person, and even directly contact them via LinkedIn. 
  • See if they’ve posted in the group discussions — If so, start by commenting on the post item. If they’ve posted a lot, keep commenting on what they say for a few posts, then send them a private message (using the Reply Privately link shown at the end of the post) asking them a question about what they said.
  • Try to engage them in a conversation — Once you’ve established a bit of a relationship, send your target a connection request, mentioning your common group membership and any discussions you’ve had. Do not just send the default invite; personalize it and give them a good reason to accept. There’s lots more about connection requests in the upcoming post Finding People to Invite.
  • Once you are connected — Download their vCard. A vCard is a contact information file in a standard format that most email programs can import. The vCard icon on LinkedIn is easy to miss. It’s located at the bottom of the first main box on a connection’s profile and it looks like the following figure. The vCard is likely to include their email address and not much else.

Figure 15 — LinkedIn vCard Icon

  • Email them — Periodically (don’t spam) email your contact with a bit of news or other information that they will be interested in, and ask for their comments.
  • Watch their activity — The various activities that your connections take on LinkedIn show up on your LinkedIn main page in a timeline. If a connection changes their profile, changes their status, or joins a group, a notice appears on your LinkedIn home page. You can comment on these events and activities as appropriate and build your relationship with them.
  • Ask when the time is right — Only after you’ve established a deep-enough relationship with your new connection should you start discussing the reason you wanted to know them. Exactly when and how to do this is something you’ll have to figure out for yourself. Put yourself in their position: If they asked you to take an action, would you? 

Building Relationships on LinkedIn is the 83rd in a series of excerpts from our book, Be a Person: the Social Operating Manual for Enterprises (itself part of a series for different audiences). We’re just past page 247 . At this rate it’ll be a long time before we get through all 430 pages, but luckily, if you’re impatient, the book is available in paper form at bit.ly/OrderBeAPerson and you can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

Infinite Pipeline book cover

Get our new book, The Infinite Pipeline: How to Master Social Media for Business-to-Business Sales Success online here. You can save $5 using Coupon Code 62YTRFCV

What Others Are Saying

Infinite Pipeline offers practical advice for using social media to extend relationship selling online. It’s a great way to get crazy-busy prospects to pay attention.”
—Jill Konrath, author of SNAP Selling and Selling to Big Companies

“Sales is all about relationships and trust. Infinite Pipeline is the ‘how to’ guide for maximizing social networks to find and build relationships, and generate trust in our digital age.”
—Sam Richter, best-selling author, Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling (2012 Sales book of the year)

Infinite Pipeline will be the authority on building lasting relationships through online social that result in bottom line business.”
—Lori Ruff, The LinkedIn Diva, Speaker/Author and CEO of Integrated Alliances

Next up: Finding Partners on LinkedIn


[1] Email Dossier: bit.ly/cg5ld6